Aid Network > Where we help > Indonesia 

Help for remote islands

There is almost no medical help available for children with cleft lip and palate on lots of to the outside world mostly unknown Indonesian islands. Prof Bambang Pardjianto takes care of these children and regularly undertakes operating campaigns which set out from Malang, a large city at the eastern end of Java, Indonesia's main island. The RSUD Dr Saiful Anwar Hospital in Malang is our local contractual partner. The effort to search for and find the affected children and their families is considerable, as is the surgical team's travel to the regional hospitals. It is against that background that the cost for an operation in this region currently lies at 350 euro. That the programme is running so well at all is mainly due to Prof Pardjianto and his large number of mostly volunteer Indonesian assistants.

The first successful surgical mission of Prof Pardjianto's team took place from April 24 to May 1, 2016 on the islands of Flores and West Timor. A second campaign followed from November 17 to November 25, 2016. In all, a total of 104 cleft children were successfully treated! In 2017 and 2018 the team from Malang visited several other islands and once again managed to operate on more than 100 cases stemming from the poorest parts of the Population.

Join the help

In order to reach and treat the cleft children on the remote islands of Indonesia we need additional funding. On top of the actual costs of the operation itself there are airfares that have to be paid and the outreach work to find the cleft children and their families to be considered. For most of the affected children this is the only chance of receiving help.

Join the help by donating and enabling operations for cleft children, some who live on very remote islands of the Indonesian archipelago.

Join the help by donating and enabling operations for cleft children, some who live on very remote islands of the Indonesian archipelago.
Join the help by donating and enabling operations for cleft children, some who live on very remote islands of the Indonesian archipelago.

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